RICH  NEWMAN


Richard Newman, Colonial & Early American Horologist and Past Chair of the NAWCC Board of Directors. Newman has lectured in the U.S. and abroad, written over 20 articles on early clocks and watches for the Watch & Clock Bulletin and other international publications, and hosts a website on Colonial and Early American watch makers, www.colonialwatches.com, to promote research and education.

RICH  NEWMAN

FRANK  HOHMANN  III


After graduating Princeton in 1968, Frank L. Hohmann III spent 33 years on Wall Street, mostly running global derivatives at Donaldson, Lufkin, and Jenrette. He is the author (with others) of Timeless, Masterpiece American Brass Dial Clocks, Stretch: America’s First Family of Clockmakers, Claggett: Newport’s Illustrious Clockmakers, and Captured Motion: the Sculpture of Harriet Whitney Frishmuth. A Trustee of Winterthur Museum and the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, he is a Liveryman in the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers, London, and serves on for-profit boards in the U.S. , U.K. , and Ireland.

FRANK  HOHMANN

DAVID  LINDOW


David Lindow started his career in horology in 1990 apprenticing under Gerhard Hartwigs, owner of Hartwigs Clock Company. Gerhard was the last apprentice at J.E. Caldwell, Jewelers in downtown Philadephia in the early 1960’s. After his apprenticeship he set himself up as a clock manufacturer and produced clock movements as well as other timing devices such as those used in alarm systems etc. He also manufactured other items not related to horology. David’s apprenticeship lasted 5 years after which he worked at Kyden Machine in Salt Lake City, UT learning better machining techniques that would translate to horological production. After this “journey” to UT David returned to Pennsylvania under Hartwigs’ employ and began applying his newly learned techniques to the production of period style tall clocks and Patent Timepieces. In 1997 Gerhard Hartwigs died of cancer, and David officially took ownership of the business in 1998 and expanded the production of clocks and horological tooling. It was then that the business was moved to its present location in Gravity, PA (Lake Ariel). In 2006 David developed and began producing the Lindow Rose Engine which made available a newly manufactured engine turning machine for the first time in over 60 years. Since then over 100 of these machines have been produced and are represented all over the world. He was also instrumental in the production of the MADE Lathe which brought rose engine production to a new height.


In his career David has produced over 1500 clock movements and restored countless period antique clocks. He has become known for his ability to handle extremely difficult jobs where many components are missing and to restore these clocks sympathetically. His restoration work can be seen in the Philadelphia Museum of Art for whom he has worked as a consultant. He has also worked for the Detroit Museum of Art and keeps the clocks at the University of Pennsylvania. His period reproduction work can be seen at Monticello, Colonial Williamsburg, Clinton Library in Arkansas, Bush Library in Texas, and the Indiana State Museum just to name a few. David has also been a frequent lecturer and teacher for both horology and engine turning throughout the United States. 


 

DAVID  LINDOW

MARY  JANE  DAPKUS

Mary Jane Dapkus has had the pleasures of putting herself through college (a multi-decade process), earning two advanced degrees, pursuing a variety of careers, and serving briefly as curator of the American Clock & Watch Museum. She has contributed a number of articles to the NAWCC's Watch & Clock Bulletin and to other publications. Her work has formed the basis for several exhibits. Together with the late Dr. Snowden Taylor, she is co-author of the book Antebellum Shelf Clock Making in Farmington and Unionville Villages, Connecticut (NAWCC 2019), and author of a second book, Joseph Ives & the Looking Glass Clock, now available for purchase.  She will have copies with her at the symposium which she will be happy to sell and sign upon request.   She was the Willard House Museum's 2015 Robinson Lecturer, and the feature presenter at the 2019 NAWCC Eastern States Regional. A Fellow of both the NAWCC and the American Clock & Watch Museum, she delights in serving as contributing editor of the ACWM's Timepiece Journal.  

MARY  JANE DAPKUS

BRUCE  R.  FORMAN

Bruce R. Forman began his lifetime interest in horology when he worked for John B. Spencer, Sr., a clockmaker who serviced many of the historic clocks in the Philadelphia region.  Mr. Forman later authored some 40 articles related to the history of clockmaking and horological tools.  In the year 2000, he finished 13 years of research and published the book “Clockmakers of Montgomery County 1740-1850.”  He has served as President of NAWCC Philadelphia Chapter 1 and NAWCC Chicagoland Chapter 3 and is currently the editor of the “Tool Enthusiasts’ Round-Up”, a newsletter devoted to the history and use of horological tools.  One of his most memorable achievements was to participate in the conservation of the world famous David Rittenhouse astronomical/musical clock at Drexel University.

BRUCE  R.  FORMAN

SARA  SCHECHNER

Sara Schechner, Ph.D. is the David P. Wheatland Curator of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard University. She is a historian of science, specializing in material culture and the history of astronomy.  At Harvard, she is a Lecturer on History of Science in the History of Science Department and has been on the faculty of the Museum Studies program.


Schechner earned degrees in physics and the history and philosophy of science from Harvard and Cambridge.  Before returning to Harvard’s History of Science Department, Schechner was chief curator at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, and curated exhibits for the Smithsonian Institution, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society.  Her books include Comets, Popular Culture, and the Birth of Modern Cosmology (1997), Time and Time Again: How Science and Culture Shape the Past, Present, and Future (2014) and Tangible Things: Making History through Objects (2015, with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Ivan Gaskell, and Sarah Carter).  Time of Our Lives: Sundials of the Adler Planetarium (2019) is the first of two interpretive catalogues that set these time-finding instruments in North America's most comprehensive collection into cultural and social context.


Schechner's research, teaching, and exhibition work work has earned her many awards. She is the 2019 recipient of the Paul Bunge Prize from the German Chemical Society and the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry, which is regarded worldwide as the most important honor in the history of scientific instruments.  In 2018, the American Astronomical Society presented her with the LeRoy E. Doggett Prize for Historical Astronomy.

SARA  SCHECHNER

DON  N.  HAGIST

Don N. Hagist is managing editor of Journal of the American Revolution (allthingsliberty.com). His focus on demographics and material culture of the British Army in the American Revolution grew from the discovery that there was paucity of literature on the common British soldier, and that much of the conventional wisdom on the subject was inconsistent with available first-hand information. This led to a continuing quest to find and assimilate primary sources in Great Britain and America to better understand the thousands of professional British soldiers who served during the 1775-1783 war.


Don’s specific areas of expertise include British operations in Rhode Island, demographics of the British army, and wives of British soldiers. He maintains a blog about British common soldiers, redcoat76.blogspot.com, and has published a number of articles in academic journals. His most recent books, The Revolution’s Last Men: The Soldiers behind the Photographs (Westholme Publishing, 2015) and British Soldiers, American War (Westholme Publishing, 2012), are available from major booksellers. His newest book, The Men Beneath the Red Coats, has just been released; see WSJ review.  Don is an engineer for a major medical device manufacturer in Rhode Island, and also writes for several well-known syndicated and freelance cartoonists. He can be contacted at dhagist@mail.com.

DON  N.  HAGIST

SUNNY  DZIK

Sunny Dzik is the author of Engraving on English Table Clocks: Art on a Canvas of Brass, 1660-1800 (2019). He is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and a practicing physician at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston (USA) where he serves as a consulting hematologist and specialist in transfusion medicine. Sunny graduated from Princeton University with a degree in Romance Languages and Literature and received his MD degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He trained in Internal Medicine and Hematology at Boston University Medical Center and did his fellowship training at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. His medical research has included efforts to improve transfusion therapy for children with malaria in Uganda. Sunny has received numerous honors in the field of medicine including the James Blundell Award (England), and the Emily Cooley and the Tibor Greenwalt Awards in the United States. Sunny maintains a free digital library of English table clock images at www.englishtableclocks.org.


SUNNY  DZIK

CHARLES  F.  HUMMEL

Author of With Hammer in Hand. The Dominy Craftsmen of East Hampton, New York. University Press of Virginia for the Winterthur Museum. Four printings, 1968-1982.  Revised and enlarged digital edition, no restrictions link at http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/Dominy.HammerInHand.  November, 2018.  Co-author, interpretive website, link at http://dominycollections.winterthur.org.  Author of A Winterthur Guide to American Chippendale Furniture, Middle Atlantic and Southern Colonies. Rutledge Press/Crown Publishers, 1976. Co-author with Beatrice Garvan, The Pennsylvania Germans: A Celebration of Their Arts, 1683-1850. Philadelphia Museum of Art/Winterthur Museum, 1982. Senior Deputy Director of Winterthur (retired, 1991).  No rocking-chair retirement. Adjunct Professor, University of Delaware and Academic Programs, Winterthur Museum, 1992-2002.  Taught graduate level course, “The American Craftsman to 1790”.  Author of nineteen material culture and American decorative arts articles, 1955-2005, and five book reviews, 1992-2002.  Awarded honorary Doctor of Fine Arts Degree, University of Delaware, 2013. 

CHARLES  F.  HUMMEL

GARY  R.  SULLIVAN

Gary R. Sullivan is a nationally recognized expert in the area of early American clocks and furniture. He is an author, lecturer, exhibition curator, and television appraiser, with over 40 years of experience in the antiques business. He shares his expertise as an advisor to institutions and individuals, helping them to assemble and refine collections of fine and important American antique clocks and furniture. Gary also shares his expertise through ongoing appearances on the PBS series, “Antiques Roadshow.” Based in Sharon, Massachusetts, Gary is an award-winning author and has written and contributed to several books including Musical Clocks of Early America, 1730-1830,  Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, and Harbor & Home: Furniture of Southeastern Massachusetts, 1710–1850.   

GARY  R.  SULLIVAN

DONALD  L.  FENNIMORE

 Donald L. Fennimore is curator emeritus at the Winterthur Museum. Prior to retirement his career at Winterthur began with the Winterthur Program in Early American Culture, a two-year graduate program in conjunction with the University of Delaware. Upon graduation he joined the curatorial staff at Winterthur and served thirty-four years specializing in metalwork. In addition to curating, he taught in the Winterthur Program and published numerous articles and books among which are Metalwork in Early America (1996), Iron at Winterthur (2004), Silversmiths to the Nation, co-authored with Ann Wagner (2007), Stretch: America's First Family of Clockmakers, co-authored with Frank L. Hohmann III (2013) and Claggett: Newport's Illustrious Clockmakers, co-authored with Frank L. Hohmann III (2018).

DONALD  L.  FENNIMORE

ELIZABETH  FOX

Elizabeth Fox has served as curatorial assistant of American Art at the Worcester Art Museum since January 2019. Currently, her projects involve the reinstallation of WAM's American Galleries, which will explore the cost of luxury in early American visual and material culture. She received her M.A. in Decorative Arts & Design History from the Smithsonian and George Washington University (2018), and her B.A. in History and Religion from Furman University (2016). She also participated in the Decorative Arts Trust’s Fall 2019 Symposium and Colonial Williamsburg’s 70th Annual Antiques Forum as scholarship recipient. During her academic career, Elizabeth acquired positions at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Smithsonian American Art Museum/National Portrait Gallery Library, and the U.S. State Department’s Diplomatic Reception Rooms. Her most recent publication, “ ‘A Fine Craftsman in the Best Tradition’: The Clock-making Trade of Isaiah Lukens,” is the basis of her presentation.

ELIZABETH  FOX

DAMON DIMAURO

Damon DiMauro received a BA from Tulane University, a PH.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and an MA from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.  He teaches in the Department of English, Languages & Linguistics at Gordon College, and he has published on French and Italian literature as well as on genealogy and local history.  Recently he began to publish on early-American horology with four articles in the NAWCC Bulletin, two of which concern the Mullikens: "Samuel Mulliken's Account Book" and "Mulliken versus Wingate: 'A Dispute about an Apprentice.'"  Presently, with co-author Bob Frishman, he is researching a comprehensive biography and catalogue of the Mulliken family of Colonial and Federal Massachusetts clockmakers, to be published by the Concord Museum.

STEVE PETRUCELLI

Steve Petrucelli of Cranbury, NJ received a BS from Lehigh University, an MS and a Ph.D. from Rutgers University.  He has presented programs at New Jersey Historical Societies: Burlington, Monmouth, Hunterdon, Trenton as well as NAWCC Regional and National meetings.  As the Director of Adams Brown Company, he collaborated with Dr. James Biser Whisker in the publication of books on Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia Clockmakers.  Currently he is working with the Morven Museum & Garden, Princeton, NJ for a Spring 2023 exhibition of New Jersey Tall Case Clocks. 

CHRIS  STORB



Christopher Storb has worked as a furniture conservator for over 40 years. Most recently he worked at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from 2003 to 2019. His expertise is in the history of woodworking techniques, processes, and materials, coupled with the ability to share that expertise in a meaningful way with students and the general public. He has lectured and written widely on historic furniture and maintains the blog “In Proportion to the Trouble” where he examines all things regarding the arts and mysteries of woodcraft.